28 Jan 2010

Marol-Maroshi Road






Of the many villages that dot Mumbai and have been gobbled up by the megapolis, there are quite a few Roman Catholic ones like Orlem in Malad (W) and Marol in Andheri (E). There are several other villages closer to the coast built around the fishing industry. Most of them date back to the days when Portuguese ruled this part of the Western Coast.

Before the Portuguese were chased away by the Peshwas and the British, this colony around Mumbai was larger than Goa and their Brazilian holdings (at that time), making it their largest colony. All that remains now are a few churches named after the Portuguese and the East Indian community that's more Indian than any other historical influences.

This picture is from the village of Marol which has a substantial Christian population, now made up of Christians from all over India. That's an old vinyl print being used to shade a roadside cigarette shop.


Clicked using a 2mp Nokia n63 phone camera


9 comments:

bythewindowsill said...

wonder what biblical reference though...

SloganMurugan said...

Reference. Jesus came to India and he saw a lady fallen on the footpath. He said to the lady : 'In ancient Palestine, I walked on water. In India, I tried to find a footpath to walk on and failed, just like you.

SUR NOTES said...

i love this photograph. when is the bby exhibition being planned? i want to buy a signed copy of this one.

Anil P said...

In the embrace of the gods. Nice perspective.

Orlem has a more distinct, more pronounced catholic presence than Marol.

SloganMurugan said...

Thank you all.

Sur. Will surely let you know if that happens :)

Anil, you are right. But Marol is also as interesting.

slew said...

fucking brilliant!

Simz said...

Lovely snap ...

Pallavi said...

Wonderful picture...great perspective. And to think it was shot with a phone camera!!!
Would love to see this work in a Gallery!
Thanks, Michelle, for steering us to this page.

vini said...

it looks so real...WOW

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